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Good Reads: “The Value of Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences to National Priorities: A Report for the National Science Foundation”


 
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine recently released a report, “The Value of Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences to National Priorities: A Report for the National Science Foundation,” which identifies research priorities for the National Science Foundation. As its name suggests, this report highlights the importance of investments in social, behavioral, and economic sciences in confronting major challenges faced by the United States. It argues that these disciplines are essential to our understanding of and support for the welfare of our country.

This is a long-held belief of the Odum Institute, which has provided support to researchers studying issues that impact people and society as a whole. The Odum Institute enables researchers in the social sciences as well as other disciplinary domains to fully address societal challenges by offering tools, training, and consultation in quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods analysis, data science, survey research, and data management. Though our scope has widened in recent years to better serve the greater campus research community beyond the social sciences, we strongly believe in the importance of the social sciences as well as the dangers of underestimating their usefulness and relevance to all disciplines.

From the report description:
“Having a fundamental understanding of how people and societies behave, why they respond the way they do, what they find important, what they believe or value, and what and how they think about others is critical for the country’s well-being in today’s shrinking global world. The diverse disciplines of the social, behavioral, and economic (SBE) sciences-―anthropology, archaeology, demography, economics, geography, linguistics, neuroscience, political science, psychology, sociology, and statistics―-all produce fundamental knowledge, methods, and tools that provide a greater understanding of people and how they live.”

Read the full report here.
 
 
 

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