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January Short Courses


Basic Access to Census Data

January 17 | 9:00am – 12:00pm | Health Sciences Library, Room 227
This is a hands-on workshop organized by the UNC ResearchHub to help users understand the strengths of various Census data retrieval tools, both freely available ones and those to which the library subscribes: American FactFinder, the Census Bureau’s freely available database; Social Explorer, a commercially licensed tool to which the library subscribes; and the grant-supported (so, free to you) National Historical Geographic Information System (NHGIS). These tools provide access to pre-constructed data tables published by the Census Bureau. Some are better for the most recent data and others are useful for historical data. Come learn how to choose the best tool for your research, and the ins and outs of each tool.

Visit the event on our website for more information.

 

Getting Started with R (Part 1)

January 18 | 2:00 – 3:30pm | Davis Library ResearchHub
We are kicking off R Open Labs with two full-length short courses: Getting Started in R – Part 1 and Part 2. These short courses will help you install the necessary software and introduce you to the fundamentals of working in R.

Once you’ve completed Getting Started in R, you can continue to practice and develop your skills by attending our weekly R Open Labs. Each lab will include a period of brief instruction on a new topic, followed by time to practice, work together, ask questions and get help.

For information about this week’s topic and R Open Labs in general, visit http://ropenlabs.web.unc.edu/. R Open Labs is a collaboration between the UNC Chapel Hill Libraries Research Hub and the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science.

 

Advanced Access to Census Data

January 23 | 9:00am – 12:00pm | Health Sciences Library, Room 227
This is a hands-on workshop organized by the UNC ResearchHub to help users understand the strengths of various Census (and other survey) data retrieval tools which allow the creation of custom cross-tabulations (that is, custom data tables). Tools to be covered include: DataFerrett; iPUMS; TerraPopulus (in beta); and the Triangle Research Data Center (TRDC). The first three tools are freely available and we will focus on their census data content (U.S. for DataFerrett; U.S. and international for iPUMS and TerraPopulus). Researchers must apply to the Census Bureau (or other federal agency, e.g., the Centers for Disease Control) for access to the TRDC in order to utilize various survey microdata. Application procedures will be discussed.

Visit the event on our website for more information.

 

Making an Impact with Data Visualization

January 23 | 2:00 – 4:00pm | Davis Library ResearchHub
Collecting data is now easier than it has ever been. But, as data becomes more prolific, datasets become larger and more complex. How do we find meaningful patterns in our data? How can we communicate those patterns to others? Data visualization allows us to make sense of today’s ever evolving information landscape.

This workshop, organized by the UNC ResearchHub, organized by will introduce the history and basic principles of data visualization. Learn about best practices and resources for making an impact with your data through compelling charts, graphs and maps.

 

Getting Started with R (Part 2)

January 25 | 2:00 – 3:30pm | Davis Library ResearchHub
We are kicking off R Open Labs with two full-length short courses: Getting Started in R – Part 1 and Part 2. These short courses will help you install the necessary software and introduce you to the fundamentals of working in R.

Once you’ve completed Getting Started in R, you can continue to practice and develop your skills by attending our weekly R Open Labs. Each lab will include a period of brief instruction on a new topic, followed by time to practice, work together, ask questions and get help.

For information about this week’s topic and R Open Labs in general, visit http://ropenlabs.web.unc.edu/. R Open Labs is a collaboration between the UNC Chapel Hill Libraries Research Hub and the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science.

 

Stata with Cathy Zimmer

January 29, 30, February 2 | 3:30 – 5:00pm | Davis Library, Room 219
This is a 3-part short course (held over three afternoons). Stata part 1 will offer an introduction to Stata basics. Part 2 will teach entering data in Stata, working with Stata do files, and will show how to append, sort, and merge data sets. Part 3 will cover how to perform basic statistical procedures and regression models in Stata.

For more information please visit the event on our website.

 

NVivo Hands-on Workshop (Part 1)

January 30 | 2:00 – 4:00pm | Davis Library, Room 3010
This session will allow participants to work through a textual document in the PC version of NVivo, a software program for coding textual data such as interviews, focus groups, and field notes. It combines editable text and multimedia capabilities with searching and linking, as well as theory building. Text files can also be linked to graphics or audio files. The program provides an attribute system which can be used for coding demographic variables. It supports visual models, including the specification of types of links between objects in the model.

For more information, please contact Paul Mihas (paul_mihas@unc.edu).

 

Python I

January 30 | 4:00 – 6:00pm | Davis Library ResearchHub
This workshop, organized by the UNC ResearchHub, will introduce attendees to the Python programming language. We’ll help you install Python 3 and the Anaconda distribution, execute your first lines of code, and explore the basic functionality of Python. After this workshop, attendees should be better placed to start working on a specific project in Python, learning along the way, or work through more in-depth training.

Python is widely used by researchers in many disciplines, and can be used to accomplish or automate many tasks outside academia. General computer skills are required, but specialized prior knowledge in computer programming is not required.

Click here to register.

 
 


 

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